The Top 10 Facts About Manufacturing and Warehouse Jobs

Manufacturing in the U.S. has been declared dead more than once. It was given “last rites” when the Midwest became known as the “Rust Belt” during the 1980s and manufacturing was once again counted out when manufacturing and light industrial jobs were sent overseas. More recently, “experts”, said that the U.S. would become a nation of hamburger flippers and techies. They were wrong!

Manufacturing in the U.S. is alive and well. Here are some interesting facts about manufacturing and warehouse jobs.

  1. Manufacturing adds more than $2.17 trillion to the American economy, adding $1.40 for every $1.00 spent by manufacturers.
  2. Small business rules in the manufacturing sector. About 85% of all manufacturers have fewer than 50 employees.
  3. Manufacturing and warehouse jobs constitute about 9% of the workforce. There are more than 12 million manufacturing jobs and an additional 18 million support jobs.
  4. There won’t be enough people to fill the jobs in manufacturing over the next ten years. It is estimated that 2 million of the 3.5 million jobs that will be created in this sector will go unfilled. There won’t be enough people with the skills to fill forklift operator jobs, for example.
  5. Workers without college degrees made almost 11% more in manufacturing than similar workers in other sectors of the economy.
  6. In 2014, manufacturing salaries averaged almost $80,000 a year, including benefits. By comparison, workers in other industries only earned a little over $64,000. The average hourly wage for a manufacturing worker was $25.19 per hour.
  7. In 2015, 92% of the workers in manufacturing companies were eligible to receive health insurance; this compares to an average of 79% for all businesses.
  8. U.S. manufacturers were forced to become more competitive in the global marketplace, stimulating growth in the sector. Since 1987, worker productivity has increased by 250%. Manufacturers of durable goods have experienced the greatest growth.
  9. Manufacturers are innovative, accounting for about 75% of all private sector research and development, more than from any other sector.
  10. The export of goods manufactured in the U.S. has quadrupled in the past 25 years. Manufacturing firms who export their products pay their workers 18% more than workers receive elsewhere.

There is enormous variety in manufacturing jobs, such as warehouse jobs and packaging jobs. The quality of American goods and the productivity of American workers bodes well for the continued growth of the manufacturing sector.